Monthly Archives: March 2016

Augustine, Christ, and Time

Aurelius Augustine (354-430), developed a method of understanding the temporal significance of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth that eschews reliance upon dating systems both ancient and modern. Augustine realized that the incarnation and resurrection cannot really be understood according … Continue reading

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Time, and the Birth of Christ, in the New Testament

The Gospel of Matthew records the birth of Jesus as occurring toward the end of the reign of Herod the Great, King of Judaea, who died in the year 4 Ante Christos/Before the Common Era. Matthew’s Gospel portrays the world … Continue reading

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Anno Domini

is coming an hour and now is… The birth of God become man, the nativity of the Son of God, the act of the Word becoming flesh, the incarnation of Christ, the Messiah, is the central moment in human history … Continue reading

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Montaigne and Repentance

Michel de Montaigne, the French writer of Essays, was a thinker. Alone in a library, his library, pondering. Alone, as he was in conception, as he will be in death. Alone, facing his maker, facing the universe, facing himself. No … Continue reading

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Montaigne and Human Folly

In the opening note to the reader in Montaigne’s Essays, the author suggests, since the Essays are only about the experiences and ruminations of Michel de Montaigne himself, that it is folly to read further. Montaigne was quite right, of … Continue reading

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Montaigne’s Trials

The French thinker Michel de Montaigne wrote in his essay, Of Books: “I make no doubt that I often . . . speak of things that are much better, and more truly, handled by those who are masters of the … Continue reading

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Michel de Montaigne’s View of Time

Michel de Montaigne, the sixteenth-century French aristocrat, was neither saint, priest, nor monk, rather a worldly man who lived in a secular time of conflict between Protestants and Catholics. Montaigne was a landowner, a government official, and soldier. He was … Continue reading

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